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Coronavirus' business impact: West Nile Virus Infections Medicine Market Comprehensive Research Report and Forecast to 2027 - Latest Herald

Coronavirus' business impact: West Nile Virus Infections Medicine Market Comprehensive Research Report and Forecast to 2027 - Latest Herald


Coronavirus' business impact: West Nile Virus Infections Medicine Market Comprehensive Research Report and Forecast to 2027 - Latest Herald

Posted: 26 Apr 2020 08:00 PM PDT

"

West Nile Virus Infections Medicine Market 2018: Global Industry Insights by Global Players, Regional Segmentation, Growth, Applications, Major Drivers, Value and Foreseen till 2024

The report provides both quantitative and qualitative information of global West Nile Virus Infections Medicine market for period of 2018 to 2025. As per the analysis provided in the report, the global market of West Nile Virus Infections Medicine is estimated to growth at a CAGR of _% during the forecast period 2018 to 2025 and is expected to rise to USD _ million/billion by the end of year 2025. In the year 2016, the global West Nile Virus Infections Medicine market was valued at USD _ million/billion.

This research report based on ' West Nile Virus Infections Medicine market' and available with Market Study Report includes latest and upcoming industry trends in addition to the global spectrum of the ' West Nile Virus Infections Medicine market' that includes numerous regions. Likewise, the report also expands on intricate details pertaining to contributions by key players, demand and supply analysis as well as market share growth of the West Nile Virus Infections Medicine industry. 

Get Free Sample PDF (including COVID19 Impact Analysis, full TOC, Tables and Figures) of Market Report @ https://www.researchmoz.com/enquiry.php?type=S&repid=2548524&source=atm

West Nile Virus Infections Medicine Market Overview:

The Research projects that the West Nile Virus Infections Medicine market size will grow from in 2018 to by 2024, at an estimated CAGR of XX%. The base year considered for the study is 2018, and the market size is projected from 2018 to 2024.

The report on the West Nile Virus Infections Medicine market provides a bird's eye view of the current proceeding within the West Nile Virus Infections Medicine market. Further, the report also takes into account the impact of the novel COVID-19 pandemic on the West Nile Virus Infections Medicine market and offers a clear assessment of the projected market fluctuations during the forecast period. The different factors that are likely to impact the overall dynamics of the West Nile Virus Infections Medicine market over the forecast period (2019-2029) including the current trends, growth opportunities, restraining factors, and more are discussed in detail in the market study.

Leading manufacturers of West Nile Virus Infections Medicine Market:

The following manufacturers are covered:
CEL-SCI Corp
Fab'entech SA
Hemispherx Biopharma Inc
Kineta Inc
Nanotherapeutics Inc
Plex Pharmaceuticals Inc
Theravectys SA

Segment by Regions
North America
Europe
China
Japan
Southeast Asia
India

Segment by Type
AGS-v
BG-323
CEL-1000
FDX-000
Others

Segment by Application
Hospital
Clinic
Others

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Some important highlights from the report include: 

  • The report offers a precise analysis of the product range of the West Nile Virus Infections Medicine market, meticulously segmented into applications
  • Key details concerning production volume and price trends have been provided.
  • The report also covers the market share accumulated by each product in the West Nile Virus Infections Medicine market, along with production growth.
  • The report provides a brief summary of the West Nile Virus Infections Medicine application spectrum that is mainly segmented into Industrial Applications
  • Extensive details pertaining to the market share garnered by each application, as well as the details of the estimated growth rate and product consumption to be accounted for by each application have been provided.
  • The report also covers the industry concentration rate with reference to raw materials.
  • The relevant price and sales in the West Nile Virus Infections Medicine market together with the foreseeable growth trends for the West Nile Virus Infections Medicine market is included in the report.
  • The study offers a thorough evaluation of the marketing strategy portfolio, comprising several marketing channels which manufacturers deploy to endorse their products.
  • The report also suggests considerable data with reference to the marketing channel development trends and market position. Concerning market position, the report reflects on aspects such as branding, target clientele and pricing strategies.
  • The numerous distributors who belong to the major suppliers, supply chain and the ever-changing price patterns of raw material have been highlighted in the report.
  • An idea of the manufacturing cost along with a detailed mention of the labor costs is included in the report.

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The Questions Answered by West Nile Virus Infections Medicine Market Report:

  • What are the Key Manufacturers, raw material suppliers, equipment suppliers, end users, traders And distributors in West Nile Virus Infections Medicine Market ?
  • What are Growth factors influencing West Nile Virus Infections Medicine Market Growth?
  • What are production processes, major issues, and solutions to mitigate the development risk?
  • What is the Contribution from Regional Manufacturers?
  • What are the Key Market segment, market potential, influential trends, and the challenges that the market is facing?

And Many More….

"

Coronavirus live updates: Patton Village officer reportedly in critical condition - Houston Chronicle

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 12:00 AM PDT

This article contains Friday's updates to the coronavirus pandemic. For Saturday's updates, click here.

10:30 p.m. The U.S. Department of Defense has banned all travel for military and civilian personnel, according to a memo reported by the Washington Post. 

The memo also applies to families assigned to DoD installations, facilities and surrounding areas within the United States.

Exceptions may be approved if  travel is ""(1) determined to be mission-essential; (2) necessary for humanitarian reasons; or (3) warranted due to extreme hardship," the memo states.

8:40 p.m. The Patton Village police officer who tested positive for COVID-19 is currently in critical condition, according to a tweet from Houston Police Officers' Union President Joe Gamaldi.  

The man previously attended a barbecue cook-off event at the Houston rodeo on Feb. 29. He is among three cases in Montgomery County.

The officer — tasked with administrative duty — had been out of the office and outside Patton Village since Feb. 27, Police Chief Shannon Sharp said in a news release, later saying that he was off-the-clock on comp time. Police said the officer has had no recent contact with the public, such as calls for service and arrests.

7:47 p.m. All SAT tests administered Saturday at HISD host campuses have been canceled, the district announced.

6:45 p.m. During a Friday news conference, Mayor Sylvester Turner and city officials said testing will ramp up next week for the new coronavirus, including drive-through testing for people in the Houston region who have received an order from a licensed practitioner, reports the Chronicle's Jasper Scherer.

Gov. Greg Abbott, who declared a state of disaster Friday morning, first announced the drive-thru testing. Turner said drive-thru locations would open sometime next week, though he said it was not clear yet how many testing centers would open or how much additional testing capacity they would add.

Dr. David Persse, the city's public health authority, said the drive-thru locations would be largely staffed by various Houston hospitals, who already provide the bulk of testing in Houston.

The city is currently able to conduct 58 tests at its labs per day.

"That's the gap that this is going to fill, is the fact that a lot of doctor's offices don't have the particular type of swab it requires, or they don't have personal protective equipment or they don't have a relationship with a lab that can do it," Persse said.

6:15 p.m. A Galveston County hospital is contending with a shortage in new coronavirus tests by creating some of its own, reports the Chronicle's Nick Powell.

University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston created its own tests, but they only have the capacity to assess about 20 people per day, said Philip Keiser of the Galveston County Health District.

"(The CDC) keeps saying they're gonna send more tests but the problem is the way they're allocating it, there's not enough to go around and the demand exceeds supply," Keiser said. "Houston burned through their supply very, very quickly."

6:04 p.m. Add Houston Zoo to the growing list of Houston-area closures amid the coronavirus pandemic. On Friday, the zoo announced it will temporarily close through April 3, reports the Chronicle's Marcy De Luna.

"We have been closely monitoring the constantly evolving situation regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak and feel it is our responsibility to do what we can to help reduce the rapid spread of COVID-19," the zoo said in a statement.

6:02 p.m. Multiple facilities are closed and programs suspended in Harris County's Precinct 1, Commissioner Rodney Ellis announced.

The following facilities and programs are closed until March 31:

  • All Precinct 1 Community Centers
  • Organized youth sports at Precinct 1 sports fields
  • Harris County Aquatics Program
  • Youth After-School Programs
  • All Senior Programs
  • Precinct 1 Transportation Services

Precinct 2 also released a list of closures, which can be found on its website. 

5:50 p.m.Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo plans to call an emergency session of Commissioners Court on Tuesday, her office said.

The session will focus on coronavirus-related items to ensure the county remains prepared to handle the outbreak, the Chronicle's Zach Despart reports. It will be streamed online like other meetings, though access to the public may be limited, as health officials worry about community spread of the virus.

5:45 p.m. The Museum of Fine Arts Houston will be suspending public programming starting tomorrow through March 30.

According to a message from Director Gary Tinterow, this includes all films, tours, workshops, and events. Tickets already purchased will be refunded or applied to future programs, depending on preference.

Email guestservices@mfah.org with any questions or requests.

5:12 p.m. HISD families who rely on school meals can get food at several area high schools next week, the district said.

In partnership with the Houston Food Bank, HISD will distribute food daily at five high schools starting Monday through March 20. A sixth high school will offer a one-time food distribution site Saturday.

Families will need to sign-in. The program will be extended as needed, the district said.

Saturday, March 14

  • Chavez High School, 8501 Howard Drive, 9 a.m. - noon

Monday, March 16 through Friday, March, 20 (daily)

  • Milby High School, 1601 Broadway St., 9 a.m. - noon
  • Wisdom High School, 6529 Beverly Hill St., 9 a.m. - noon
  • Kashmere High School, 6900 Wileyvale Road, 1 - 4 p.m.
  • Madison High School, 13719 White Heather Drive, 1 - 4 p.m.
  • Northside High School, 1101 Quitman St., 3 - 6 p.m.

5:05 p.m. Baytown Mayor Brandon Capetillo signed a local disaster declaration for the city to limit the spread of COVID-19.

There are no confirmed cases in the city, officials said. Community events sponsored by the city -- or scheduled to take place in city parks or facilities -- may be canceled or postponed.

5 p.m. H-E-B stores in Houston will now close earlier to help keep shelves stocked.

All H-E-B, Joe V's Smart Shop, Mi Tienda and Central Market locations will close at 8 p.m. today. Modified hours of 8 a.m to 8 p.m. will go into effect tomorrow until further notice, the company announced.

"Please remember that while preparation is important, panic is not necessary," the company said.

4:39 p.m. The city of Houston announced its fourth case of COVID-19, this time involving a woman between 70 and 80 years old who recently traveled to Egypt.

The woman is quarantined at home. Multiple other patients in the Houston region were exposed during a Nile River cruise in Egypt, but health officials in Houston say the new patient took a different cruise there.

4:35 p.m. The Galveston County woman who tested positive for COVID-19 in Austin is from Friendswood, the city announced.

The woman, who is self-quarantined in Austin, became symptomatic in Friendswood on March 5 and traveled to Austin the following day, officials said.

Galveston County officials said the case is linked to the Montgomery County case involving a man in his 40s. The city of Friendswood said it is not aware of a community spread in the city or Galveston County.

4:25 p.m. Missouri City Mayor Yolanda Ford has declared a local disaster.

The city limited access to some of  its facilities and suspended multiple programs and services.

All fire station tours and visits are suspended until further notice. The Missouri City Citizens Police & Fire Academy is postponed. Also, The Recreation & Tennis Center, 2701 Cypress Point Drive, will be closed today through March 29.

All events, programs and room rentals at the Recreation & Tennis Center will be canceled during that time.

CORONAVIRUS UPDATES: Stay informed with accurate reporting you can trust.

4:05 p.m. Fort Bend County reported an additional three cases of the new coronavirus, all travel related, health officials said.

The cases include a man in his 40s. He was exposed to other COVID-19 cases abroad, health officials said. He first experienced moderate flu-like symptoms, which have resolved.

A woman in her 50s also experienced mild symptoms, which have subsided. Additionally, a man in his 70s was hospitalized and discharged in good condition.

All three patients have a history of international travel and remain in isolation at home, health officials said. Officials did not specify where they traveled.

3:38 p.m. OTC is TBD as of today, writes Chronicle reporter Paul Takahashi.

The Offshore Technology Conference, which drew about 60,000 attendees last year, was set to take place May 4 to 7 at NRG Center. It will now be moved to either August or September.

"OTC recognizes the unprecedented global challenge associated with the current COVID-19 pandemic," organizers said in a statement. "The health and safety of our partners, attendees, exhibitors, staff, and community are of the utmost importance, and our hearts go out to all who have been affected."

3:25 p.m. Shelves are empty, depending apparently on where you are.

Head to a Kroger, Costco or H-E-B and you'll find slim pickings and long lines, according to Chronicle reporters Paul Takahashi and R.A., Schuetz.

Hector Solis, 21 — who had packed a grocery cart to the brim with frozen hot pockets, chicken and other foods at the Polk Street Kroger Thursday afternoon — said he decided it was to start stocking up after scrolling through social media earlier that day.

"I saw online everybody posting pictures of the aisles all empty," he said. When he went to grocery stores, that's exactly what he found.

Some shoppers were more worried about the panic shopping than the coronavirus itself.

"I think of it as just another flu," said Julia Navas, 33, who was at the Polk Street Kroger buying extra food for when her children stay home for spring break. "But if (panicked shoppers) start taking everything off the shelves, we'll have a hard time getting the things we actually need. You're making it harder on everyone else."

Friday morning, the Montrose H-E-B was busily restocking, and the grocery posted a message on its Facebook page attempting to calm the crowds.

"Customers should not panic, as we are continuing to restock shelves around-the-clock," it said. "We are encouraging preparedness, not stockpiling - please buy what you need and leave some for your neighbor behind you. We are in this as a community and it's important to keep calm."

In other markets, however, there was plenty for sale.

Numerous people reported Asian-themed markets doing just fine on supplies.

Meanwhile some elected officials, including Gov. Greg Abbott, were advising people to take it easy on the bulk buying.

"There is absolutely no need to go out and stockpile supplies," Abbott said.

2:33 p.m. President Trump on Friday declared a national emergency, about two hours after Gov. Greg Abbott did the same across Texas.

"We will overcome the threat of the virus," Trump said.

The declaration unleashes $50 billion in emergency funds and allows federal officials to waive various rules allowing hospitals to treat those infected with COVID-19.

"What you have seen now with this order is that we are going to be able to remove the constraints," said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the Centers for Disease Control.

As testing becomes the vocal point of containing and treating the virus, Trump said the government and pharmaceutical industry are cooperating in the hopes 500,000 tests would be available by next week.

"No resource will be spared, nothing whatsoever," Trump said.

The goal, Trump said, is to streamline and put the full weight of the government and nation behind the effort.

"Our over-riding goal is to stop the spread of the virus," Trump said. "This will pass through and we are going to be even stronger for it."

President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference about the coronavirus in the Rose Garden at the White House on March 13, 2020, in Washington.

Trump also said in response to the virus and its effect on the economy, he directed federal officials to make a major purchase of oil for the nation's strategic petroleum reserve.

"The price of oil went down so we are going to fill it up," Trump said.

2:25 p.m. Coronavirus is keeping visitors away from incarcerated friends and relatives for the foreseeable future.

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) has temporarily suspended visitation at all facilities statewide until further notice due to the ongoing threat of the coronavirus, according to a Friday statement from the TDCJ, Chronicle reporter Rebecca Hennes said.

"While we understand the value and significance of the visitation process at our facilities, we also understand the importance of providing and maintaining a safe and healthy environment for all involved," the statement read.

The move follows suspension of cancelation of visiting hours at some of the largest jails in the region.

2:07 p.m. Concern is a fertile turf for cons, something medical experts are already seeing as the new coronavirus spreads in the U.S.

In a post, Shanley Pierce with Texas Medical Center News notes federal officials already have warned seven companies to stop claiming their wares cure COVID-19.

"During this turbulent time, there's always someone who's going to benefit from something like this," infectious disease expert Laila Woc-Colburn, M.D., associate professor and director of medical education at Baylor College of Medicine's National School of Tropical Medicine, told Pierce. "People use this opportunity when there's a fear or a new disease in order to gain something. Right now, we don't have any vaccines, pills, potions or products that we use for the disease COVID-19."

Texas Medical Center News is an in-house publication of the medical center.

CORONAVIRUS UPDATES: Stay informed with accurate reporting you can trust.

1:56 p.m. UT President Gregory L. Fenves didn't have to look far for the first signs of COVID-19 on the Austin campus.

In a letter to the university community, Fenves said that it was his wife Carmel who tested positive for the virus after traveling to New York for several events with alumni and students last week, Chronicle reporter Brittany Britto reports.

"After the trip, Carmel started exhibiting mild flu-like symptoms. She tested negative for the flu yesterday and was then tested for COVID-19. This morning at 5:30 a.m., we received the news that she had tested positive," Fenves wrote. "This news came several hours after local health officials had announced two other, separate cases in Travis County."

Fenves said a second member of his family, who also works at UT, is presumed to have the virus as well. All three of them, Fenves included, are now in self-isolation.

"Under normal circumstances, I would not describe the details of an individual's illness. However, given the widespread impact of COVID-19, Carmel and I wanted to share this information with you so members of our community can take proper precautions," Fenves wrote.

UT officials had already announced this morning that classes are canceled. In addition to UT-Austin, Texas Southern University and Houston Community College announced today that classes are canceled for the day.

After announcing an extension of its spring break Thursday, Houston Community College again made an announcement via Twitter Friday, canceling classes through spring break. Classes will resume online on Wednesday, March 25 and there are plans to reschedule tests, according to officials. The decision follows HCC's announcement that there was a possible exposure to coronavirus at two buildings.

Texas Southern University suspended classes Friday "due to expanded concerns related to coronavirus." Classes will resume online on March 23 following the university's spring break next week.

1:12 p.m. Settle in for a long break for area schoolchildren, Chronicle reporters Jacob Carpenter and Shelby Webb said.

Hours after nearly all Houston-area districts announced they will be closed through next week in an effort to reduce the spread of the virus, education leaders said Friday they are preparing to remain out of school well beyond this month.

"We're planning as if we're going to have to do school remotely for the remainder of this (school) year," said Fort Bend ISD Superintendent Charles Dupre, whose district serves about 78,400 children, the region's fourth-highest total.

Curtis Culwell, executive director of the Texas School Alliance, a coalition of about 40 large districts across the state, said emergency declarations by local and state governments and growing awareness about the potential for widespread infections have caused school leaders to recalibrate their expectations.

"If we'd had this discussion two days ago, I think we'd have said (school closures) would last a couple weeks, maybe to the first week of April," Culwell said. "I think the reality that's beginning to sink in is, this could be longer than that."

A host of complications come with the closure. Education leaders continued preparations Friday for accommodating students' academic and food needs, with some districts announcing plans for the beginning of next week.

School districts technically cannot get reimbursed for school meals delivered off-site or to smaller groups until the Texas Department of Agriculture gets a waiver from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. TDA officials said they submitted a waiver request Thursday morning, and hope to receive approval in the next couple of days.

Nonetheless, districts across the region are planning to deliver student meals starting early next week. A few districts, including Aldine and Klein ISDs, already have announced pickup times and locations. In Fort Bend ISD, where about 40 percent of children quality for free or reduced lunches, district officials plan to announce details on a curbside meal pickup schedule by early Friday afternoon — regardless of whether the district expects to receive a waiver in time to provide food.

"Any superintendent worth their salt is saying, 'We're feeding kids,'" Dupre said.

12: 20 p.m. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said 39 confirmed cases of COVID-19 are known across Texas, though dozens more Texans have been tested, declaring a state disaster that opens the door to state funding and oversight.

The move allows Texas to swiftly move forward with funding and responding to various needs in containing and treating the disease. State officials will also coordinate with nursing homes and hospitals to restrict visiting and protect elderly and sick residents.

"We want to make sure we do all we can to protect this vulnerable population," Abbott said.

Health officials are also encouraging people to self-quarantine themselves if they have any signs of illness.

"We don't need people who are sick coming into work," he said.

Abbott also said stores should not be overrun, as deliveries continue.

"There is absolutely no need to go out and stockpile supplies," Abbott said.

Gov. Greg Abbott has announced a new program offering pardons tohuman trafficking and domestic violence victims charged with crimes related to their abuse

Work at the state level started more than a month ago.

Thirty-five states and the District of Columbia have issued similar disaster declarations, according to the National Governors Association. Emergency declarations vary by state but generally give governors broader ability to make directives that protect people and property and sometimes indicate that he or she is preparing to request federal aid.

Abbott's declaration came a day after President Donald Trump addressed the nation and announced a 30-day ban on most Europeans entering the country and at the tail end of a week filled with major cancelations, some unprecedented, from the Houston Rodeo and South by Southwest in Austin to professional sports league shutdowns to in-person classes at colleges and universities.

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner and Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo had issued local disaster declarations Thursday after a Montgomery County man with no recent travel history tested positive for COVID-19, possibly the state's first instance of community spread.

12:03 p.m. Houston-area Southern Baptist churches were urged Friday to cancel live gatherings for the next two weeks, Chronicle reporter Rob Downen said.

In a lengthy blog post, Josh Ellis, head of the Union Baptist Association, urged the area's roughly 325 churches to "flatten the curve" of the virus's spread through social distancing.

"Time is of the essence," Ellis wrote. "...This is the time to consider strategies for being a good neighbor. "

The recommendation follows decisions by several large SBC churches -- including Houston's First Baptist Church, Champion Forest Baptist Church and West University Baptist Church -- to move services online.

Second Baptist Church of Houston, which is among the country's largest of any denomination, had not announced any closures as of noon on Friday.

SBC churches are all autonomous and self-governing, and so are free to remain open regardless of Ellis' suggestions.

Leaders of other denominations have also called for the suspension of in-person services. On Thursday, East Texas' top United Methodist official asked that churches move worship online.

11:48 a.m. East Texas is on the verge of its first COVID-19 case, it appears.

Citing health information of individuals who have returned to Jefferson County from a cruise, Jefferson County Judge Jeff Branick is planning to sign a disaster declaration Friday evening, Beaumont Enterprise reporter Kaitlin Bain said.

He said he couldn't give more information about the circumstances surrounding the people's, but said the county at this time does not have any confirmed cases of COVID-19.

"I'm probably going to sign a disaster declaration when I get back this evening," he said. "We will then make a decision on some conference calls with the Department of State Health services on what we're going to do with the fair."

11:40 a.m. Galveston County has confirmed its first presumptive COVID-19 case., sort of.

In a release, the county's health district said the woman is 30-35 years old and her case "is directly linked to Montgomery County Public Health's presumptive positive case involving a man in his 40s. The woman was tested by Austin Public Health and is currently self-quarantined in Austin. She is a resident of northern Galveston County."

Health officials said the risks should be kept in perspective.

"This is a rapidly evolving situation. We understand this presumptive positive case may concern our community, but at this time there is no evidence of community spread," said Dr. Philip Keiser, Galveston County local health authority. "The immediate risk for Galveston County residents remains low. We have worked very hard planning and preparing for this moment. There are steps in place to safeguard the community."

Officials will discuss the issue further at a 1 p.m. news conference.

11:31 a.m. Another chance to eat food cooked over a flame bites the dust.

The concerns over being in public have pushed many to stock up their pantries, something the Chornicle's Greg Morago says requires people to consider proper provisions.

COVID-19 has not only altered our lives, it has forced us to think about how we shop and the foods and supplies we buy.

Fourteen days of food and water is what the Department of Homeland security recommends before a pandemic. Now that we're in one, it has become even more essential to know how to best prepare your family.

11:18 a.m. Houston area gyms are doing some heavy-lifting to lessen the odds of spreading sickness, writes Chronicle reporter Julie Garcia.

While classes remain on the schedule at Houston's Black Swan Yoga locations, common practices have been changed to handle COVID-19, the new coronavirus that has been officially declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization.

"We (usually) have props in the studios — blocks and straps you can use to get in poses, but we've removed all the props from the rooms and are encouraging students to bring their own," said Olivia Keller, owner and instructor at Black Swan on White Oak Drive.

It begs the question: Should you go to the gym during the coronavirus pandemic?

No governmental agency has advised against it. But if there was ever an "Enter at Your Own Risk" scenario, a building with the sole purpose of making you sweat is it.

The virus is thought to be spread mainly from person-to-person who are in close contact with one another (6 feet or less) through respiratory droplets from coughs or sneezes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There's no word on sweat, though.

While it may be possible to contract the virus by touching a surface or object carrying the virus before touching their own mouth, nose or eyes, the CDC does not believe that's the main way the virus is spread.

11:07 a.m. The health museum in Houston is hosting a public event Saturday where one piece of advice likely to come up is not to go to public events. That's why they're only doing it via Facebook.

From 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., the John P. McGovern Museum of Health and Medical Science in collaboration with UTMB will host a public Coronavirus Preparedness Panel and Q&A Discussion with local experts from UTMB and Baylor College of Medicine. The event features Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and director of the Texas Children's Center for Vaccine Development and Texas Children's Hospital Endowed Chair of Tropical Pediatrics. Hotez has been a leading expert in advising people to take proper precautions such as limiting exposure to others.

In a release the museum calls the event "a one-of-a-kind opportunity for event attendees to have their questions answered directly from the experts."

They'll just have to sibmit those questions electronically.  Juan Alanis, who handles media relations for the museum, said officials are aware of the concern some residents might have to attending the event, so Friday morning they opted for a strictly live-streamed gathering on the museum's Facebook page.

The Q&A also tucks in nicely with a traveling exhibit currently at the museum. Titled Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World, the display items include a history of pandemics in the Houston area.

Thursday, museum officials canceled a screening of the movie Outbreak, but have not yet canceled an April 9 screening of Contagion.

10:38 a.m. Bloomberg is reporting that President Trump will declare a national emergency today, opening the door to federal assistance to states and municipalities dealing with outbreaks of the new coronavirus.

Trump had already confirmed, via Twitter, a 3 p.m. press conference.

10:20 a.m. The potential for long stays at home have advocates focused on making sure some low-income communities and newcomers to the region receive the same level of attention as the rest of the Houston area.

In Gulfton, among the most diverse communities in the region and among the most densely-packed with blocks of apartments, many families will get most of their information from local schools, said Anne Whitlock, founding director of Connect Community, which works in the Gulfton and Sharpstown area with residents to improve health and community development.

"The worry is how to keep them productively engaged," Whitlock said of residents, especially children, who live in very close confines and often mingle among neighbors.

Officials also are in the early stages of figuring out what school cancelations mean for residents and pupils.

"They are going to send them home with a ton of resources, but it is not going to be optional," Whitlock said, noting many homes will not have quality internet service.

Help could be on the way for that, according to Chronicle Techburger columnist Dwight Silverman.

Comcast is beefing up its internet service for low-income customers in response to the growing number of people who may be forced to stay home as the coronavirus advances in the United States, increasing download and upload speeds and providing a 60-day free trial.

Starting Monday, Internet Essentials' speeds will jump to 25 megabits per second for downloads from 15 Mbps. Uploads will increase to 3 Mbps from 2 Mbps. New customers who sign up will get 60 days of free service. Internet Essentials costs $9.95 per month.

On a site devoted to AT&T's response to the pandemic, the company noted its own low-income internet offering:

"Many of our AT&T Internet customers already have unlimited home internet access, and we are waiving internet data overage for the remaining customers. Additionally, through Access from AT&T we'll continue to offer internet data to qualifying limited income households for $10 a month."

Whitlock said beyond the early stages of setup for school, she and others are reaching out as the initial response to the new coronavirus settles in to the apartment complexes.

"My biggest fear is the longer it goes on the less effective social distancing becomes because people go stir crazy," she said.

She already saw some signs of that Thursday.

"None of the children seem to be upset. For them it seems to be a big hilarious holiday."

10:03 a.m. It's clear not everyone is heeding the advice of city health officials and staying away from large crowds. They're contributing to them outside area stores.

Many certainly are not following the six-foot rule when it comes to social distance.

The good news, at least for the long lines, is there is not a major problem in terms of supply.

As Houstonians hunker down and prepare for possibly long periods of time at home, they are stocking up on all sorts of items, while officials urge them to take precautions but avoid panic.

9:48 a.m. San Antonio has its first travel-related cases of COVID-19.

In making the announcement, Mayor Ron Nirenberg says city is banning large gatherings of 500 or more poeple, for at least the next seven days.

City health director Dawn Emerick said the case is considered travel-related and not transmission within the area. The person tested positive yesterday and is self-quarantined in stable condition.

"We have to stay the course as we continue to prepare, take precautions, practice social distancing and take extra care to safeguard our most vulnerable populations," Emerick said.

9: 38 a.m. Now the Boston Marathon is pushed to September, per AP.

Pressure had mounted in recent weeks from officials in Boston and the seven cities and towns along the 26.2-mile (42.2-kilometer) course. Some had expressed worries not only for the health of the 31,000 registered runners but also the estimated 1 million spectators who traditionally line the route, giving athletes hand slaps, high fives and even kisses as they pass.

President Donald Trump's order restricting most Europeans' travel to the United States over the coronavirus complicated efforts to salvage the race. Thousands of runners come from Europe to compete at Boston.

9:22 a.m. Jim Nantz is going to have a ton of free time for the next few weeks.

Augusta National decided Friday to postpone the Masters because of the spread of the coronavirus, according to AP.

Club chairman Fred Ridley says he hopes postponing the event puts Augusta National in the best position to host the Masters and its other two events at some later date.

Ridley did not say when it would be held. The PGA Tour has canceled all events through the Masters, and golf has a full schedule of events through the year.

Delaying the golf tournament is the latest in a host of sports shutdowns, including the NCAA men's basketball tournament, where Nantz along with the Masters is the central face for CBS.

Though the closings will give him far less to write about, they are a good decision, says Chronicle sports columnist Jerome Solomon.

If you're still debating whether this is an overreaction, perhaps you care more about sports than people.

Oft misdescribed as a diversion from the real world, sports aren't played by fictional characters from make believe lands. Athletes might indeed perform superhuman feats of strength and agility, but they are no less human.

8:42 a.m. The Harris County Juvenile Justice Center is closed until further notice as officials work through a possible visit from someone infected with the new coronavirus.

In an email distributed to prosecutors obtained by the Chronicle, Harris County District Attorney's Office Intake Division Chief Jim Leitner said a person who had been in the building this week was quarantined as a suspected COVID-19 case.

"Accordingly the JJC has been shut down and no one from our office is allowed to enter until further notice," Leitner wrote, ordering those who might have been working at the JJC not to report to work.

The news of spread in a detention center didn't surprise Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez.

Aurelia Ray showed up bright and early before 9 a.m., worried about her daughter, currently in the detention center.

"I have a 15 year old daughter in there with chronic asthma," Ray said. "She's been intubated twice. I don't want my daughter up there in a bunk."

The coronavirus just exacerbated the mother's concern, she said.

"I'm not even worried about coronavirus I'm just worried about her asthma."

8:32 a.m. Ted Cruz will remain homebound for a bit longer, his office said in a statement.

"I still have no symptoms and feel fine, and I was looking forward to taking my family out to dinner tonight," the senator said. "Unfortunately, last night I was informed I had a second interaction with an individual who yesterday tested positive for COVID-19."

Cruz said he met March 3 with Santiago Abascal, the leader of the Vox Party in Spain. The two shook hands and then took photos together.

"My understanding is that Mr. Abascal tested positive for COVID-19 last night," Cruz said in the statement. "His staff have informed us that he was asymptomatic at the time of our meeting and that several days after our meeting he had extended interactions with another individual who has also tested positive."

Cruz isolated himself last week after coming into contact with someone who later tested positive for COVID-19 during the Conservative Political Action Conference last month in Maryland.

8:21 a.m. A Houston economist is warning the new coronavirus could really make the local economy sick.

"What happens if we send everyone home?" said Bill Gilmer, director of the Institute for Regional Forecasting at the University of Houston's Bauer College of Business. "We know if we have a hurricane what it does to employment."

The region lost about 15,000 jobs in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, he told the Chronicle's Erin Douglas. In a worst case scenario of emergency social distancing responses to prevent the spread of COVID-19, the name given to the new coronavirus, the job losses could be of a similar magnitude, he said.

A flood of temporary closures were announced on Thursday — from local school districts, to universities, to concert halls to the courts.

7:40 a.m. Austin city officials have confirmed two presumptive cases of the coronavirus, leading to the closure of local schools, including the University of Texas. These are the first cases to be confirmed in the area, officials said in a statement. Both cases are suspected of originating outside the area, meaning no evidence of community spread.

"This is concerning but not surprising and we have been prepared for the arrival of COVID-19 in our area," said Dr. Mark Escott, Austin-Travis County Interim Medical Authority, in a statement. "It is critical that the community continue to heed our recommendations and take personal hygiene seriously. This will be the key to ensuring that this virus doesn't spread."

Austin officials stressed the need for good hygiene habits and limited exposure to contain the virus, just as officials in the Houston area did. There are 18 cases as of Thursday night.

7:26 a.m. A deal could be done as early as today on some form of coronavirus aid package to reassure anxious Americans by providing sick pay, free testing and other resources, hoping to calm teetering financial markets amid the mounting crisis, according to AP.

"We have — are near — to an agreement," Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi said, emerging from her office at the Capitol shortly before 9 p.m. Thursday.

7:20 a.m. School closings because of the new coronavirus continue to spread, with UT officials early Friday saying "we now believe it is in the best interest of the campus community to close operations. We will provide additional information in the coming days."

The closing follows many other in the Houston area and around Texas. For parents, the closure of elementary and middle schools poses a new set of obstacles, writes Chronicle reporters Shelby Webb and Jacob Carpenter.

More than 20 local school districts — including Houston, Cypress-Fairbanks, Katy, Fort Bend, Humble and Aldine ISDs — announced they would be closing next week to help slow the spread of the new coronavirus.

The closures vary in length, with some announced just for next week and Houston ISD remaining closed until March 31. Those could be extended if circumstances change.

As 8-year-old Brevon Dorsey walked out of Spring Branch Elementary School with his three siblings Thursday, he told his father Brodrick that teachers said they might have to shutdown the school.

Brodrick Dorsey shook his head.

He works for a health care provider and said he thinks he will be slammed at work for the foreseeable future. Now, he worries he will have to cut back on his hours to watch his four kids if Spring Branch ISD is closed for long. As of Thursday, the district said it would only close Friday and for its regular spring break, which begins on Monday.

"That'd be less money for me to pay my bills," Dorsey said. "As a single parent I can't afford to lose anything. I can't afford childcare, I don't know what I would do. Maybe just home school them the best we can."

This live blog will be updated throughout the day. Check back here and on HoustonChronicle.com's coronavirus landing page to stay up-to-date with all the latest news and analysis.

Houston told of rodeo tie to coronavirus case before K-pop concert - Houston Chronicle

Posted: 11 Mar 2020 07:28 PM PDT

CONROE _ Montgomery County officials delivered the news to Harris County and Houston officials early Tuesday evening that one of their residents who tested presumptively positive for COVID-19 also attended last month's Houston Rodeo cookoff, officials said.

The Houston tie to Montgomery County's first known case was not disclosed until Wednesday afternoon when Mayor Sylvester Turner announced that the Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo would be closed to prevent "community spread" amid large gatherings. Montgomery County officials informed Houston at around 6-7 p.m. Tuesday, about two hours before a packed crowd gathered for a K-pop concert, said Jason Millsap, chief of staff to County Judge Mark Keogh.

Montgomery County officials declined to mention the patient's visit to Houston during a morning news briefing because it was out of their jurisdiction, Millsap said.

A lack of disclosure surrounding the COVID-19 case has left some, including a state lawmaker, worried. During the news conference, officials at the Montgomery County Public Health District said the patient, a man in his 40s, had no recent travel history outside Texas but left out his visit to the famed rodeo.

Millsap said the man tested positive for COVID-19 around 4 p.m. and was well enough to retrace where he had been the past two weeks. The rodeo grounds were the most significant location, Millsap said, while other places he had been in Montgomery County were determined to be "low risk" areas. He was around his family, extended family and around co-workers at an unidentified workplace.

Turner, at a reporter's pressing, disclosed that the man had attended the rodeo. Turner also expanded on the Montgomery County man's prognosis — and the stark reality that the illness is spreading — as city and health officials moved to cancel the Houston Rodeo. The lack of information shared at the first news conference in Conroe was frustrating to state Rep. Steve Toth (R-The Woodlands), who attended the meeting but was unaware of the patient's Houston ties until hours later on his drive back to Austin.

"I'm frustrated," Toth said in a phone call. "I get the whole thing about wanting to make sure we don't violate their HIPPA rules, but I think the lack of frank reporting (from public officials) of honest information is going to cause more doubt when we speak later on what we know to be true."

The scarcity of information was also troubling to Shirley Tilton as she went with her husband, James, to see his doctor at the Houston Healthcare facility in Conroe. He has stage four cancer, she said.

"I feel nervous being in a hospital because they're not telling us which hospital he's at," Tilton said. "They're wasting our time by telling us nothing."

Visitors to the hospital on Texas 336 Loop are facing stricter rules amid the growing pandemic. Anyone who enters the hospital is required to disclose if they have a fever or other symptoms of a lower respiratory illness, have had close contact with a person infected with COVID-19 in the last two weeks or if they have traveled to an "affected geographic area."

HELP OUR REPORTING: We're trying to learn more about the new coronavirus and its impact in Houston. If you have something to share, or know anyone quarantined, please fill out this form.

The unidentified patient has been hospitalized since Tuesday and those in close contact with him in the northwest part of the county are being monitored, said Melissa Miller, of the Montgomery County Hospital District. The presumptive positive is awaiting additional confirmation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, she said during the news conference.

Miller would not say how long the man has been symptomatic or elaborate, the condition of his health or where he was receiving treatment. She said it was not yet known how he contracted the illness or where. The majority of COVID-19 cases have been in the Houston area and are linked to a Nile river cruise in Egypt. The first COVID-19 diagnosis in the Houston area involved a Fort Bend County man who went on the Nile trek. The case was announced on March 4, about four days after the cookoff ended.

The new case also prompted Montgomery ISD Superintendent Beau Rees to cancel school Thursday and Friday for a deep cleaning ahead of spring break.

The county is currently monitoring 21 people, some of whom had contact with the patient. Since Feb. 7, 39 people have been monitored and 14 have been under investigation. Of those tested, Miller said eight are still pending results.

The man's employer was made aware of his diagnosis, Miller said.

Bitcoin Drops to $5860, Lowest since October 2017. True Believers with Fake Hopes Got Cleaned Out by Early Movers - WOLF STREET

Posted: 23 Jun 2018 11:52 PM PDT

Down 70% from the peak. This is just not fun anymore.

Bitcoin dropped to $5,860 at the moment, below $6,000 for the first time since October 29, 2017. It has plummeted 70% in six months from the peak of $19,982 on December 17. There have been many ups on the way down, repeatedly dishing out fakes hopes, based on the ancient theory that nothing goes to hell in a straight line (chart via CoinMarketCap):

If you're a True Believer and you just know that bitcoin will go to $1 million by the end of 2020, as promised by a whole slew of gurus, including John McAfee – "I will still eat my dick if wrong," he offered helpfully on November 29 – well you probably don't need this sort of punishment. You're suffering enough already. And I apologize. I feel your pain. I was a true believer too a few times, and every single time it was a huge amount of fun, and I felt invincible and indestructible until I got run over by events.

With 17.11 million bitcoins circulating today, if bitcoin were at $1 million today, it would amount to a market cap of $17 trillion. But new bitcoins are constantly being created out of nothing ("mined") by computers that suck up enormous amounts of electricity. And by the end of 2020, there will be many more bitcoins, and if the price were $1 million each, the total would amount to about the size of US GDP.

This doesn't even count all the other cryptos that would presumably boom in a similar manner, amounting perhaps to half of global GDP, or something.

People who promote this brainless crap are either totally nuts or the worst scam artists. But I feel sorry for the True Believers whose fiat money got transferred and will continue to get transferred from them to others.

So OK, there's still some time left. It's not the end of 2020 yet. And True Believers still have room for the fake hope of a $1-million bitcoin.

But at the moment, bitcoin is even worse – incredibly – than one of the worst fiat currencies in the world, the Argentine peso, which has plunged "only" 35% over the period during which bitcoin plunged 70%. That takes some doing!

There is always some reason or other that is cited for the drops: The endless series of hacks into exchanges during which crypto tokens and coins just vanish. Nervous regulators cracking down on the scams surrounding cryptos, initial coin offerings (ICOs), and how they're being promoted. Or advertising platforms such as Facebook, Google, and Twitter, and email newsletter platforms restricting ads and promos about cryptos and ICOs.

And then there were studies that showed how Tether, via the crypto exchange Bitfinex, was used to manipulate up bitcoin last year. Manipulation is good as long as it is upward manipulation. But it's apparently not working anymore.

A lot of big hedge-fund and family-office money was plowed into it last year with great fanfare that was thickly plastered all over the media, thus creating artificial demand for something useless that is in artificially limited supply. It worked amazingly well for a while. Now these funds are having trouble getting their money out without crashing the cryptos any further.

Whatever it is, it's just not fun anymore.

In the end it's always same: A miraculous ascent of anything begets more buying in the belief that this miraculous ascent will continue, and it continues until some folks decide to pull their money out. They have the early-mover advantage and they're laughing all the way to the hated fractional reserve bank with their hated fiat currency. Everyone else is getting dragged down.

The overall crypto space peaked on January 4, when market cap reached $707 billion, according to CoinMarketCap. Less than six months later, market cap has now plunged by 66% to $243 billion, despite continued creation and sale of coins and tokens that add to that number.

Among the other biggest cryptos:

Ethereum plunged 68% from its peak of $1,426 on January 13, to $440 at the moment. Market cap collapsed from $138 billion to $44 billion:

Ripple plunged 88% from its peak of $3.84 on January 4 to $0.453. Market cap went from $148 billion to $17.8 billion.

Bitcoin Cash plunged 83% from its peak of $4,138 on December 20 to $679 at the moment. Market cap dropped from $70 billion to $11.6 billion. On November 12, I featured Bitcoin Cash in an article subtitled, "Peak Crypto Craziness?" where I was observing how it quadrupled in two days to $2,448.

EOS plunged 59% from its peak of $18.16 on January 12, to $7.18. I pooh-poohed it on December 18 with "The Hottest, Largest-Ever Cryptocurrency ICO Mindblower." The purchase agreement that buyers in the ICO had to sign – the ICO was not offered in the US due to legality issues – stated explicitly that holders of EOS have no rights to anything related to the EOS platform, and that they get nothing other than the digital token. A perfect digital scam surrounded by piles of logical-sounding gobbledygook.

Litecoin plunged 79% from its peak of $363 on December 19, to $76 at the moment. Market cap went from $19.7 billion to $4.3 billion. Its founder admitted on December 20 that he'd wisely cashed out his entire stake, with the first-mover advantage. The True Believers have simply gotten run over by events.

There are now 1,586 cryptos listed on CoinMarketCap. Anyone can create them, and they do. This compares to about 160 fiat currencies. And in the end, it was fun for those that got out in time – those that grabbed the first-mover advantage in one of the most elegant wealth transfers of the century.

One of the biggest such deals ever, happening now: How investors allow a group of PE firms to extract $3.75 billion from a company after they'd already extracted billions. Read… This Deal Shows How the Junk-Credit Market is Still Irrationally Exuberant

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